Mapping of poaching communities, understanding customs and providing livelihood to buy conservation support

The project was implemented by WWF India to work specifically with people from the Mogiya caste, who are involved in hunting and collection of ethnobotanical plants from forest areas.

Livelihoods and Conservation: protecting species by supporting local communities in Cambodia

Farmers in the northern plains of Cambodia farmers eked out a meager existence growing rice, cutting trees from the forest and hunting wildlife, and were in direct competition with critically endangered species such as the Giant Ibis.

Community-Based Ecotourism as a tool to reduce poaching in Malaysia

When the Tidong community was given the opportunity to engage in ecotourism - which generated alternative incomes and livelihoods - the incidence of illegal hunting decreased.  However, when the funding bodies and associated professional managerial staff departed and the ecotourism venture was ha

Motivating local communities to protect wildlife via direct payments from ecotourism

Ecotourism as a strategy for achieving biodiversity conservation often results in limited conservation impact relative to its investment and revenue return, and projects are often criticised for not providing sufficient evidence on how the strategy has reduced threats or improved the status of th

Indigenous people engage in the fight against wildlife crime in Cambodia's last, large intact forests

The Veun Sai-Siem Pang Conservation Area (VSSPCA) is located in North East Cambodia and is the largest remaining area of intact forest in Asia. This extremely biodiverse forest is under threat from poaching and illegal logging.