Protecting the rainforest and its wildlife through sustainable livelihoods

In November 2017, Conservation International (CI) Suriname and an indigenous village called Alalapadu in southern Suriname signed a conservation agreement for the protection, conservation and sustainable use of the forest.

Mapping of poaching communities, understanding customs and providing livelihood to buy conservation support

The project was implemented by WWF India to work specifically with people from the Mogiya caste, who are involved in hunting and collection of ethnobotanical plants from forest areas.

Lower Zambezi Fisheries Management Project

The project was implemented by Conservation Lower Zambezi (CLZ) to increase the involvement of fishing communities in conservation activities, particularly to stop cross-border illegal wildlife trade.

The Altai Project

The Altai Project (TAP) aims to link the protection of nature with sustainable livelihoods in the Greater Altai region. Between 2009 and 2015, TAP focussed its efforts on both snow leopard and raptor conservation and research.

Community-Based Anti-Poaching Operation in Nepal

Poaching of wildlife for illegal international markets was widespread in Nepal in 2002. In response, the Government initiated anti-poaching measures that involved local communities.

The Black Mambas

The Black Mambas are not only Anti-Poaching Rangers, they are also role models for the rest of the community. Whilst the main objective is the security of the reserve and the protection of wildlife, the Black Mamba initiative educates the communities that live on the boundaries of Balule and the

Goats For Hope

Wildlife Conservation Society has been working with the Indonesian government to protect tigers by protecting livestock from tiger attacks by building predator-proof livestock corrals, organising night patrols to deter tigers from entering villages, and establishing a wildlife response unit that

Wildlife Protection in the Lower Zambezi

In 1994, concerned local safari operators and other stakeholders recognised the need for organised support to the national wildlife protection authority (now the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, DNPW) to combat the poaching that was decimating the wildlife populations in the Lower Zambe

North Luangwa Conservation Programme

In 1986, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, the Frankfurt Zoological Society initiated a programme in one of Zambia’s unique wilderness areas.

Community-Based Wildlife Conservation in Tajikistan

In the past, unregulated hunting and poaching of Tajikistan's wildlife not only threatened species such as the argali, Tajik markhor, urial sheep, Asiatic ibex, and snow leopard, it also compromised local peoples ability to draw sustenance from the land.